Put Up and Shut Up: The '90s So Far in Cartoons

Description

160 pages
Contains Illustrations
$15.99
ISBN 1-895854-29-6
DDC 971.064'8'0207

Author

Year

1994

Contributor

Reviewed by Dennis Blake

Dennis Blake is a visual arts teacher with the Halton Board of
Education.

Review

In some respects, “the ’90s, so far, in cartoons,” might be
considered a narrow chronological topic, but when the subject is the
politics and social life of Quebec, even a 160-page text of combined
cartoon and prose might still be considered a brief overview. Aislin
(Terry Mosher), long-time political cartoonist for the Montreal Gazette,
has been passing commentary upon Canadian political culture for decades
and to such an extent that he has, himself, become a part of this
sphere. In Put Up and Shut Up his cartoons are sharp, scathing,
wounding, and cynically spot-on. Accompanying these mini-cartoon icons
is a breezy political commentary by Hubie Bauch, an apparently
irreverent, but never irrelevant, Gazette compatriot of Mosher’s. The
book is jam-packed with cartoons—quarter-size, full-size, black and
white, and color. From Oka to Mulroney, from Bourassa to Bill 22, Aislin
and Bauch offer our recent Canadian past as a well-cooked historical
delicacy. Perhaps the history cannot be swallowed easily, but Put Up and
Shut Up can be savored longingly by all political gourmets.

Citation

Aislin., “Put Up and Shut Up: The '90s So Far in Cartoons,” Canadian Book Review Annual Online, accessed November 29, 2023, https://cbra.library.utoronto.ca/items/show/5420.