Maybe Tomorrow

Description

209 pages
$7.99
ISBN 0-7737-7486-1
DDC jC813'.54

Author

Year

2000

Contributor

Reviewed by Anne Hutchings

Anne Hutchings, a former elementary-school teacher-librarian with the
Durham Board of Education, is an educational consultant.

Review

It is 1887. All Hallows School is unique in that white and Native girls
attend the same classes and study the same subjects.

Jane Gillmor’s mother is determined that Jane shall have the
opportunities she never had, studying the classics and learning to be a
fine lady, able to assume her place in society. Reluctantly, Jane agrees
to spend one year at All Hallows School though she’d rather marry Ben
right away and go off adventuring in the wilderness. (Those who have
read Joan Weir’s earlier book, The Brideship (1998), will recognize
Jane’s mother as Lizzie, the Cockney girl, who married the young
missionary, Josh Gillmor.)

Sesuq’s grandmother is equally determined that Sesuq should attend
All Hallows. Sesuq hopes that someday she will understand why this is so
important to her grandmother. She hopes, too, that she will discover
what to do with her life.

The year at All Hallows seems endless to Jane, especially as the months
go by with no word from Ben. But Jane experiences none of the isolation
and loneliness that Sesuq feels; nor does she have to contend with
Belinda’s prejudice. Fortunately, she has Sesuq, and as their
friendship grows, Sesuq teaches her many things about nature that will
stand her in good stead in her “adventuring.” But their friendship
is threatened when Belinda manages to get Sesuq expelled from school.

This fine book, with its themes of friendship, prejudice, and cultural
diversity, will appeal to intermediate-grade girls. Although the reader
may not entirely agree with the fates of Sesuq and Belinda, in Jane’s
case one would probably say that the story ends “happily ever
after.”

Maybe Tomorrow would be a welcome addition to a multicultural or
historical fiction collection. Recommended.

Citation

Weir, Joan., “Maybe Tomorrow,” Canadian Book Review Annual Online, accessed July 16, 2024, https://cbra.library.utoronto.ca/items/show/20577.