Father Must

Description

181 pages
$20.95
ISBN 0-00-223751-2
DDC C813'.54

Author

Year

1991

Contributor

Reviewed by Christy Conte

Christy Conte is a business analyst and entrepreneur in Ajax, Ontario.

Review

Rofihe doesn’t write about extraordinary people in extraordinary
situations, or even ordinary people in unusual situations. Most of the
16 stories in this collection are rooted in the commonplace; the voices
we hear and the thoughts we share are those of everyday people.

Rofihe doesn’t explore themes in the traditional sense. Instead, he
acts as a natural conduit for the original and quirky perceptions of a
diverse cast of characters. There are the newcomers, for example:
Americo was “Born Here” and stayed, but his sisters and parents
moved back to Puerto Rico. Americo spends his free time reading the
classics (in alphabetical order), sitting on a rock two feet from shore.
“Shoes barely wet. Socks not wet.” Timothy and Michael are Irish
brothers, one transplanted to New York, the other visiting. Both
understand the power of a few words from home; either brother could, but
won’t, tell Mary what she wants to know about the islands in Galway
Bay.

Rofihe’s talent for re-creating the many minute perceptions that make
up human experience is especially apparent in the stories featuring
children. These are particularly fresh and true. With language that is
effortless and clear, Rofihe paints memories of youth that are devoid of
sentimentality. A boy in a snowsuit lies motionless in the snow, not
doing anything (except worrying the lady across the street who can’t
grasp the concept). An eight-year-old boy suddenly discovers that
somebody loves his mother.

Neighbors, friends, lovers, and relatives all appear in this
collection. Each is unique; each has his own voice, his own experience.
Rofihe’s work is truly original in content, form, and tone. Each story
is a world unto itself; each page turned, a bit of life experienced.

Citation

Rofihe, Rick., “Father Must,” Canadian Book Review Annual Online, accessed February 21, 2024, https://cbra.library.utoronto.ca/items/show/11887.